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These Common Household Products Can Destroy the Novel Coronavirus

These Common Household Products Can Destroy the Novel Coronavirus

Some household products are more effective at destroying the coronavirus than others. While many products, including cleaning wipes and disinfecting sprays, are difficult to find, there are products that still help. Below are several cleaning products you may have around the house and stores are more likely to have in stock. These household products are great substitutes to help protect against the spread of the coronavirus.

Cleaning Products That Destroy Coronavirus

 

Soap and Water


Just the friction from scrubbing with soap and water can break the coronavirus’s protective envelope. “Scrub like you’ve got sticky stuff on the surface, and you need to get it off,” says Richard Sachleben, an organic chemist and member of the American Chemical Society. Discard the towel or leave it in a bowl of soapy water to destroy any virus particles that may have survived.

Bleach


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends a diluted bleach solution (⅓ cup bleach per 1 gallon of water or four teaspoons bleach per 1 quart of water) for virus disinfection. Wear gloves while using bleach, and never mix it with anything except water. (The only exception is when doing laundry with detergent.)“Bleach works great against viruses,” Sachleben says. Just don’t keep the solution for longer than a few days because bleach will degrade certain plastic containers. Bleach can also corrode metal over time, so Sachleben recommends that people not get into the habit of cleaning their faucets and stainless steel products with it. Because bleach is harsh for many countertops as well, you should rinse surfaces with water after disinfecting to prevent discoloration or damage to the surface.

Isopropyl Alcohol 

Alcohol solutions with at least 70 percent of alcohol are effective against coronavirus. Do not dilute the alcohol solution. Alcohol is generally safe for all surfaces but can discolor some plastics, Sachleben says.

See Also

Hydrogen Peroxide

According to the CDC, household (3 percent) hydrogen peroxide is effective in deactivating rhinovirus, the virus that causes the common cold, within 6 to 8 minutes of exposure. Rhinovirus is more difficult to destroy than coronaviruses, so hydrogen peroxide should be able to break down coronavirus in less time. Pour it undiluted into a spray bottle and spray it on the surface to be cleaned, but let it sit on the surface for several minutes.

 

The original article can be found at www.consumerreports.org.

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